Updates

Latest news, events, resources, and thought pieces from the Exchange's blog

Will Diaphragms Make A Comeback?

For hundreds of years, women have used diaphragm-like devices to shield their cervixes from sperm. As early as the 14th century, women in ancient Egypt inserted carved-out lemon halves in their vaginas before sex. In the 19th century, rubber diaphragms became one of the first contraceptive methods available in the US. From the 1920s through 1950s, the diaphragm was the most widely used method in the US. However, use of the product dropped off in the decades that followed as more contraceptive options, like the pill, became available. But Caya is not your grandmother’s diaphragm....

A New Frontier in Self-Care?: Self-Removal Options for Long-Acting Contraceptives

While access to family planning is increasing around the world, equitable and timely access to removal services for long-acting and reversible contraceptives (LARCs) is still a challenge. The potential for self-removal of LARCs may increase uptake of this method for women who want more autonomy in their use of contraception, facilitating self-care in sexual and reproductive health....

Self-Care and SRH: Developing Products that Women Can Self-Administer

The development of new contraceptive technologies with the potential for self-administration is central to advancing self-care in sexual and reproductive health. However, developers must take steps to ensure that new products take women's needs and preferences into account. These steps will better facilitate the introduction and success of new self-administered methods for women globally....

Call for Comment Submissions on FDA Draft Guidance for Clinical Trials of Contraceptives

On July 11, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued new draft guidance entitled “Establishing Effectiveness and Safety for Hormonal Drug Products Intended to Prevent Pregnancy”. This guidance document provides recommendations for researchers and developers conducting clinical trials to ensure the safety and effectiveness of contraceptives. Suggestions include commentary on optimal trial design, metrics […]...

Three Funding Opportunity Announcements from the NIH

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) have three new funding opportunity announcements pertaining to contraceptive development. Brief descriptions of each and links to more information are provided here....

Rebuilding Incentives for Research and Development of Medicines

On July 11, 2019 the U.N. Human Rights Council (HRC) adopted a new resolution that had sparked debate about how to "delink" research and development (R&D) incentivization from patent systems....

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Why Contraceptive Innovation?

Despite the availability of various contraceptive methods, more than 200 million women in developing countries want to avoid or delay pregnancy yet are not using an effective family planning method. For some of these women, access to contraception is limited. For others, currently available methods do not meet their needs or preferences or are unaffordable. Innovative solutions are needed in the areas of product development, registration, pricing, and introduction to address these barriers.

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Visit our resource library for additional information about the need for contraceptive innovation.


Resources

A one-stop shop for resources related to contraceptive research and development

The CTI Exchange offers resources about contraceptive research and development, including information about products currently in development, preclinical and clinical research, and opportunities for future investment. This easily searchable resource library also includes information about regulatory requirements, quality assurance standards, intellectual property, and product introduction strategies, as well as tools for advocacy.

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Featured Resources

Other key resources related to contraceptive research and development

Calliope, the Contraceptive Pipeline Database, includes information on potential contraceptive targets and leads, products in pre-clinical and clinical development, and a selection of novel and long-acting products with limited market availability.
CAPRI, the Contraceptive Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Database, lists biological and chemical properties for 27 active pharmaceutical ingredients found in contraceptives, along with data on their pharmacology, toxicology, impurities, metabolites, and use in marketed products.
Contraceptive Drug Interactions is a database that catalogues potential interactions between contraceptive drugs and drugs from other therapeutic classes. Changes in drug pharmacokinetics, effectiveness, and adverse effects are provided.

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